gluten free edible spinach play dough {12 months of sensory dough}

gluten free edible spinach play dough by wildflower ramblings

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When I think of “play-dough,” I certainly don’t think it it should go with the word “edible.”  I just don’t want my children to feel welcome to eat my play-dough and then run off and try to eat another play-dough that is totally unedible.  This could very well happen — because what kid doesn’t love the taste of salt?  I certainly remember sneaking bites of play-dough when I was a child — hopefully it was my mother’s homemade, cooked variety.

But if my children make the “edible play-dough” with me, than perhaps it will bring more understanding to them about what equals food and what doesn’t.  And food can provide so many different wonderful sensory experiences for children!  Eating (of course), and touching and smelling!

Some of my co-hosts for the 12 Months of Sensory Dough have created amazingly delicious edible recipes (peanut butter, anyone?!), but we went with edible, but not delicious.  So they are free to “taste,” but most likely, they won’t be wanting to eat ours by the spoonful (recipe below!)

I think I’ll have to try some of the below recipes (check out all of the amazing ideas from fellow bloggers!!)

He is also allergic to gluten.  So we stick with some fun gluten-free recipes.  I love Fun at Home with Kids’ Gluten-Free Edible No-Cook Play-Dough, as well as her Pumpkin Gluten-Free Play-Dough.

We decided to make themed play-dough — for St. Patrick’s Day.  

And what is green?  Spinach!

gluten free edible spinach play dough by wildflower ramblings

Sensory play can enhance language skills!

Reading and Writing activities could include:

Speaking:  My 17 month old daughter was so excited to be part of the sensory play today.  I ask her what she likes about it, what she feels, what she thinks.  When I hear her responses, I can repeat and expand what he says by using more complex speech. “Oooh!”  “Ooh it feels so soft, doesn’t it!?” Even at her very earlier age, this shows her sentence structures and teaches a broader vocabulary.

Listening: Listening to what they have to say about the experience.  This may be inaudible in younger children, like my daughter.  Sensory play may bring out new sounds or words in their vocabulary — words and noises that come with the play time!  Encourage this language building time by sitting down and simply hearing them.

Viewing: Let your child play without interference.  You can be there without jumping in.  Allow them to experience the senses they are experiencing around them.  (Of course, always use caution when choosing materials that are age-appropriate and ability-appropriate for your child.  If they are still “mouthing,” don’t give them inedible sensory items!)

Invitation to Play

I gave them the plate of dough, along with some spoons, pipe cleaners, wooden craft sticks, wooden clothespins, St. Patrick’s Day dice.  I should have given some more items for shape stamping, since they both enjoyed that.  two bins of cloud dough, along with our All-Clad measuring spoons and cups and some egg cartons.

Our play….

DSC05445 DSC05448 DSC05462 DSC05475Desktop49 gluten free edible spinach play dough by wildflower ramblings

Gluten free edible spinach play dough recipe

We combined two very simple ingredients.  A bag of spinach (no, organic is not necessary lol) and almost a whole box of corn starch.

We blended the spinach in our all-knowing, all-powerful VitaMix Blender — we used a touch of olive oil since it needed a liquid to get it to blend well.

Then we added it to our bowl of corn starch and I kneaded it to the right consistency!

gluten free edible spinach play dough by wildflower ramblings

Clean up – Not as successful

John normally loves clean up time (for sensory play anyways — not so much with his Legos).  Today he let me do the clean up, which I was happy about, since this dough will leave a green stain over your clothes, your sheet, everything.  Make sure your kids don’t track it around the house!!  He normally loves using his broom and dust pan -- but I cut him some slack :)  When children have the tools to work on their own, to do it themselves, they will have a sense of pride in their independence and be eager to do housework!  Sensory play can extend itself into practical life work.

gluten free edible spinach play dough by wildflower ramblings


12 months of Sensory Dough

This post is a part of the Best of the Best Sensory Doughs: 12 Months of Sensory Dough!  Every month, on the 12th of the month, we will be sharing a post on a different sensory dough.  

Here are the wonderful co-hosts:

Lemon Lime AdventuresDelightful LearningGlittering MuffinsI Heart Crafty ThingsLittle Bins for Little HandsLook! We’re Learning!Natural Beach LivingPowerful MotheringStill Playing SchoolThe Eyes of a Boy, The Life of Jennifer Dawn

Best of the Best Edible Play Dough

Do you have a post on Edible Play-Dough that you’d like to share? Please link below!  Please read the following guidelines before linking up:

  • Share family-friendly posts related to the month’s theme. Feel free to link old or new posts that highlight your favorite recipes for sensory dough. Failures and unsuccessful attempts are welcome.
  • We ask that no posts are linked with copy/paste recipes from other sources. If you use a recipe from another source, please link back to the original recipe.
  • By linking up, you give permission to share your post and one photograph in future posts and through social media channels.
  • The linky will remain open for two weeks. On the 12th of each month, all co-hosts will post a new dough with their spin, highlighting at least one post from the month before and pin each post to the 12 Months of Sensory Dough Board.

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Comments

  1. says

    After having just left the page on making edible playdough using the Peeps candy, I am so glad I found this. That recipe made me sick…I can’t believe people actually think it’s a good thing to feed their children such horrible, unhealthy, poisonous foods. Thank you for this, I am looking forward to trying it out. Fun and healthy…what more can a parent ask for?

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